How Families Cope

 


  • Most military families are resilient; stress does not always translate to negative outcomes. Families’ perception of support appears to be key in promoting resiliency. Support is defined as:  1) belief that the deployed soldier is making a difference; 2) having a strong family and a strong non-deployed parent; 3) belief that America supports the wars.
  • A strong marriage was the best predictor of civilian spouses’ positive coping and adjustment while their Army spouses were deployed. The next best predictor for positive coping and adjustment was having strong social supports.[i]
  • Parents’ adaptation and coping success with deployment were the best predictors of children’s ability to cope with deployment.[ii]
  • Families who get or feel supported experience reduced deployment-related stress; support can come from their local communities, the military or religious institutions.[iii]



[i] Dennis K. Orthner and Rose Roderick. “Deployment and Separation Adjustment among Army Civilian Spouses.” Washington, DC: Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, 2005.

[ii] Dennis K. Orthner and Rose Roderick. “Adjustment of Army Children to Deployment Separations.” Washington, DC: Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, 2005.
 
[iii] Dennis K. Orthner and Rose Roderick. “Deployment and Separation Adjustment among Army Civilian Spouses.” Washington, DC: Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, 2005.