News

Articles covering topics relevant to America’s youth

Funding Opportunities
The following grants and funding opportunities are currently accepting applicants. These grants are not offered through America's Promise Alliance, but they each relate to our Five Promises.
Mother and daughter working together
Experts now know more than ever about what causes young people to fall behind and what can keep them on track. In the report Our Work, America’s Promise analyzed what exactly the field of child and youth development has learned over the past two decades and compiled a list of must-reads for anyone interested in supporting positive outcomes for youth. Here are five to start.
Teacher and student working together
The majority of principals express a strong desire to implement SEL into their curriculum, according to a recent national survey of nearly 900 principals of elementary, middle, and high schools, but most feel like they don’t have the necessary guidance, training, and support to teach these skills effectively. They want more training for teachers and greater access to research-based strategies.
Kids civic action
Of all the recommendations to accelerate progress for young people in Our Work—including building relationships and creating more pathways—the third and final may seem like the most esoteric of all: engaging the community and renewing our collective civic spirit.
Hispanic/Latino student
Two studies have been circulating the news lately that, at first glance, seem to directly contradict each other. One touts low high school dropout rates and higher college enrollment rates for Hispanic/Latino students, while another explores a more troubling fact: they may be enrolling in college, but they’re having a hard time finishing. Here’s why.
Child and Adult hgih fiving
“My advice for adults would be to foster healthy, supportive, and trustworthy relationships with young people from the beginning. Once the trust is there, adults can mentor young people in finding their passion and guide them through the process of developing into successful young adults.”
Interviewing for the job
If you had a million dollars, how would you use it to help young people find jobs? If you could change or create one policy to support youth employment, what would it be? Youth development experts tackled these questions at the 11th Annual JAG National Thought Leader Event on Oct. 11.
LIFT
Research shows that programs make more progress when they involve parents or caregivers. Yet not every organization that wants to impact kids works with and for parents. Why not? Here’s a look at some of the challenges—and a few solutions.
Grad day small
For the last five years, American Graduate Day has emphasized the importance of high school graduation through telling stories, creating resources, and building community connections.
Youth Thrive small
As Youth Thrive’s director of operations, Sara Carter works with a variety of community partners to reach more youth in North Carolina’s Wake County by increasing communication, identifying gaps, and aligning resources for youth programs and services.
Young child wearing a yellow rain coat going to school
A rural school district embracing the culture of native families in Oregon and a professional football team showing up at kids’ doors in Ohio—these are just two of the creative ways states and communities are fighting chronic absence, as featured in a new report by Attendance Works titled, Portraits of Change: Aligning School and Community Resources to Reduce Chronic Absence.
Partner header in red
From an online community dedicated to supporting foster youth to an organization focused on ending bullying, nine new organizations have joined America’s Promise Alliance as partners this month. Find more information on their goals, missions, and efforts below.
Mother Holding a sad child
For National Preparedness Month, Save the Children has produced a fun song and dance that teaches kids the basics of emergency preparedness. Plus, it keeps them moving during break time, afterschool, or at home:
Young woman being interviewed
The world of education and work continues to shift, and so do student perceptions about these areas. That’s why the Research Consortium on Career Pathways & 21st Century Skills is collaborating on a survey research project focused on high school students’ perceptions of Career Paths and 21st Century Skills.
Group photo with Community Leader Stephannie Finley
Stephannie Finley is the Executive Director of University of Colorado Colorado Springs’ University Partnerships and Public Policy.
youth looking out onto an ocean
When 19-year-old Henry Seaton was in high school, he wasn’t allowed to use either the women's restroom or the men's restroom. He had to use the nurse’s restroom instead, which the school thought was the best way to keep him from being bullied. At first, Seaton agreed with the administration. But he now has a different perspective.