Opinion

Insights from thought leaders working to improve the lives of America’s Youth

Jamie Warren

Jamie Warren

Graduating Senior, Wayland Baptist University
I first experienced homelessness with my family, then on my own. I was born to a single mother and a father who was absent because of post-traumatic stress disorder he developed after the war. Throughout my childhood, my mother, two sisters and I moved from home to home, sometimes not having one at all.
Dr. Garland Thomas-McDavid

Dr. Garland Thomas-McDavid

President, North Lawndale College Prep
This public charter school in Chicago encourages students to do two things to increase their odds of graduating from college: Raise their GPAs and attend colleges with 50 percent or higher graduation rates for underrepresented minorities.
Dennis Vega, Chief Operating Officer, America's Promise Alliance
Chief Operating Officer, America's Promise Alliance
As I have watched the news about the separation of families at the border, I can't help but think that this is a story that could have been my own. My parents both came to the United States as teenagers. My mom left El Salvador when she was 15 for the same reason most immigrants come to the United States—the American dream.
President & CEO, America's Promise Alliance
President & CEO America's Promise Alliance
John Gomperts, president & CEO of America’s Promise Alliance, the nation’s largest network dedicated to improving the lives of children and youth, has issued the following statement in response to the forced separation of children and parents at the U.S. border
Maggie Wiley

Maggie Wiley

Intern, America's Promise Alliance
As students across the country have graduated from high school, we know that the transition into the “real world” can be a challenge. Here are 10 tips that will help make the transition a little easier.
Maggie Wiley

Maggie Wiley

Intern, America's Promise Alliance
I was diagnosed during my sophomore year of high school with dyscalculia, a disorder that prohibits those who have it from understanding arithmetic. The discovery of my disability was both a blessing and a curse. A blessing, because I finally knew why I never matched up with my peers in math classes. A curse, because my high school is focused on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math.
Stephen Spaloss, Senior Vice President, Team Leadership, City Year

Stephen Spaloss

SVP, Team Leadership, City Year
In January 2018, City Year Senior Vice President of Team Leadership Stephen Spaloss was invited to speak at a Mental Health in Schools conference of social workers, guidance counselors and teachers or
Quintez Brown

Quintez Brown

Graduating Senior at DuPont Manual High School in KY
To make matters worse, coaches and peers encouraged me to continue playing sports because it could pay for my education. So I spent countless hours and days training and practicing in different sports, hoping to land an athletic scholarship…which took away from any participation in extracurricular activities and volunteering experience that aligns with my current career aspirations.
America’s Promise

America’s Promise Staff

America’s Promise
When America’s Promise talks about pathways, we’re often talking about the experiences, programs, or initiatives that help prepare young people for life after high school—often while they’re still in it. Since pathways are a key part of our GradNation Action Platform, and because it’s a term we use quite a lot, we think it’s worth exploring a little more.
Amy Curran

Amy Curran

Oklahoma Site Director, Generation Citizen
I’ve spent the last 40 years watching the state I love divest in its future. The cuts to education budgets just kept coming.
President & CEO, America's Promise Alliance
President & CEO America's Promise Alliance
In response to the passing of Former First Lady Barbara Bush, John Gomperts, president and CEO of America’s Promise Alliance released the following statement: “Yesterday, America lost a true champion
President & CEO, America's Promise Alliance
President & CEO America's Promise Alliance
Adults often complain that kids today don't respect their elders. But what happens when it's the other way around? What if young people are the ones who are not getting the respect and dignity they need to be successful in school and life?