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Leaders Tackle Challenges, Solutions in Latest Building a Grad Nation Report

June 14, 2018

In 2001, the national high school graduation rate stood at 71 percent. Today, no state in the nation has a high school graduation rate below that number, according to the latest Building a Grad Nation report.
For the First Time Ever, No State Is Reporting a Grad Rate Below 71 Percent, Says Grad Nation Report

June 05, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In 2001, the national high school graduation rate stood at 71 percent. Fifteen years later – and for the first time ever, no state in the nation has a high school graduation rate below 71 percent and there are now 39 states above 80 percent, a major milestone toward reaching the country’s goal of a 90 percent graduation rate, according to the latest Building a Grad Nation report.
2018 Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Raising High School Graduation Rates

June 05, 2018

Authored by Civic Enterprises and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University, and released annually in partnership with the Alliance for Excellent Education and America’s Promise Alliance, the Building a Grad Nation report examines both progress and challenges toward reaching the GradNation campaign goal of a national on-time graduation rate of 90 percent. AT&T, lead sponsor, has supported the report series since its inception through AT&T Aspire, the company’s $400 million commitment since 2008 to graduate more students from high school ready for college and career.…
The Economic Upside to Increasing Grad Rates

May 29, 2018

Importantly, the Alliance for Excellent Education maps the positive impacts that a 90 percent high school graduation rate would have on local economies, breaking the data down by state, metropolitan area, and demographic group so that it can be useful for local community leaders, policymakers, educators and parents.
Food for thought: Students’ test scores rise a few weeks after families get food stamps

March 27, 2018

Families receiving food stamps get their benefits once a month. A few weeks later, kids’ test scores tick up. The pattern, revealed by a new study of thousands of North Carolina families, suggests that the additional access to healthy food helps students do better in school.
A Two-Generation Approach

March 07, 2018

"Parents are their children’s first teacher,” NAZ President and CEO Sondra Samuels says. “An army of empowered parents are also the fuel needed to put pressure on systems to remove barriers to their families’ overall success and their children’s academic and life success."
How One School Came to Be at the Center of the Grad Rate Debate

February 01, 2018

If you work in any field even remotely related to education, odds are you’ve come across a headline about D.C.’s Ballou High School at some point in the past few months. Here’s a quick rundown and reminder of everything we know so far.
Lesson from National Nonprofit: To Lift Children Out of Poverty, Empower their Parents

October 05, 2017

Research shows that programs make more progress when they involve parents or caregivers. Yet not every organization that wants to impact kids works with and for parents. Why not? Here’s a look at some of the challenges—and a few solutions.
How One High School Defied the Odds to Have Every Graduate Accepted to College

June 22, 2017

Ballou High School in Washington, D.C., made national headlines when 100 percent of their 190 seniors applied to college and got accepted. School officials and students discussed the keys to their success at an event celebrating their success on June 15.
How Learning About Black History Changed My Future

February 08, 2017

In honor of Black History Month, a former teaching assistant reflects on the role that courses and films on African American history played in shaping his outlook on education. This story is part of the “90 for All” series, which examines the challenges facing traditionally underserved students, particularly low-income and homeless students, English language learners, students of color, and students with disabilities.