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Blended Learning Offers Promise as a Strategy for Re-engaging Students

April 07, 2016

This paper presents a landscape analysis of how blended learning currently is being used as a strategy to serve young adults, age 16-24, who have re-engaged in education in an effort to obtain a high school diploma or equivalency. The analysis is based on a review of relevant empirical research and interviews with program developers, practitioners and policy makers in the field.  Contributing to a nascent body of literature, this report highlights examples of how blended learning is being implemented in schools and community-based organizations.
Don't Call Them Dropouts: Understanding the Experiences of Young People Who Leave High School Before Graduation

May 20, 2014

“Don’t Call Them Dropouts,” a report by America’s Promise Alliance based on research conducted by its Center for Promise at Tufts University, was funded by Target. In the largest nationwide study of its kind to date, young adults who left high school without graduating spoke at length about their experiences and the reasons they did not complete high school on time. As the nation reaches the all-time high of an 80 percent on-time high school graduation rate, this report listens deeply to what the remaining 20 percent say is happening in their lives, and what they need to stay in school.
RAND Promising Practices: Accelerated Academics Academy (AAA)

January 15, 2014

The Accelerated Academics Academy (AAA) was an alternative middle school established in the Flint Community Schools school district in Flint, Michigan. Funded and evaluated as part of the federally funded School Dropout Demonstration Assistance Program (SDDAP), it began its operations in 1991 and continued to provide services as of 2008. The primary goal of AAA was to accelerate instruction so that students who are behind one or more grade levels could enter high school with their same-age peers.
A Profile of the Evaluation of Bayview Safe Haven Program

January 15, 2014

The Bayview Safe Haven program (BVSH) is an after school program for at-risk youth ages 10–17. It is designed to help youth stay in school and out of the criminal justice system, while positioning them for responsible adulthood and improving the quality of life in their families and community. In a community with a dearth of programs for at-risk youth, BVSH is designed to provide a hub of structured activity and to serve as a central site where public and private collaborators can channel resources and services to the youth and families of San Francisco's Bayview/Hunter's Point neighborhood.
Afterschool: Providing a Successful Route to Credit Attainment and Recovery

January 15, 2014

Afterschool provides older youth with critical academic supports including credit attainment and recovery opportunities. Many educators are turning to afterschool programs to reach students who fail one or more courses, become disengaged, or want alternatives to the traditional path to graduation. Credit recovery refers to recovering credits that are lost due to failure or drop out. Credit attainment refers to alternative methods of gaining credits outside of “seat time” in the classroom.
Beyond the Numbers: Data Use for Continuous Improvement of Programs Serving Disconnected Youth

January 15, 2014

Beyond the Numbers investigates three programs with a proven record of success with the disconnected youth population and catalogues their elements of success in data collection and use to effectively engage this population. The report distills the key lessons learned both for practitioners and policymakers aiming to improve outcomes for the disconnected youth population and raises important policy questions concerning financing, data sharing, and the standardization of outcomes.
Building A Learning Agenda Around Disconnected Youth

January 15, 2014

In this research paper comissioned by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, MDRC focuses on promising strategies to reengage disconnected young people and improve their long-term outcomes. The report's objective was to identify key leverage points for future investment by government and foundations.
RAND Promising Practices: Talent Development Secondary

January 15, 2014

The Talent Development Secondary model seeks to enhance student achievement by raising teacher expectations and youth's own expectations for themselves. The goal of the model is to change the school climate by reorganizing the school into smaller learning communities. In these learning communities, students share a common set of peers and teachers across their four years of high school, and course curricula are designed around a common, career-related theme. Teachers are expected to share common planning time and are offered professional development opportunities.