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Healthy Steps for Healthy Lives

January 15, 2014

All students should live healthy. That’s why NEA Health Information Network provides free instructional materials to support educators’ efforts to teach students in grades K-3 about healthy living. The Healthy Steps for Healthy Lives kit provides a guide featuring 14 instructional activities, a MyPlate poster offering visual examples of healthy living, and food cards identifying the five food groups. Lessons feature a “modifications” section to enable educators to tailor the activities for their classrooms and are aligned to federal nutrition guidelines.
Minority Parent and Community Engagement: Best Practices and Policy Recommendations for Closing the Gaps in Student Achievement

January 15, 2014

The report aims to increase the active involvement of minority parents in their children's schools by identifying obstacles to such engagement and recommending strategies for parents, schools and communities to come together and overcome these obstacles. In addition to providing best practices taken from leading educational organizations from across the U.S., the report also includes policy recommendations submitted to Congress and the U.S. Department of Education during the 2010 re-authorization process of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
Recommended Practices to Promote the Safety and Well-Being of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Youth and Youth at Risk of or Living with HIV in Child Welfare Settings

January 15, 2014

In this report, the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) provides recommend practices for ensuring safe and proper care consistent with the needs of each and every lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning (LGBTQ) child in the child welfare system. These recommended practices focus on the provision of services to LGBTQ youth in the areas of foster care, child protection, family preservation, adoption and youth development. These practices were designed by CWLA to help meet the needs of this vulnerable group.
Start School with Breakfast: A Guide to Increasing School Breakfast Participation

January 15, 2014

Studies of school breakfast programs have found that students who eat breakfast at school show improved academic achievement – especially in vocabulary, math and standardized tests – have better attendance records, are less likely to be tardy, and exhibit fewer behavioral and psychological problems. Children who regularly eat breakfast also have a better quality of nutrient intake and are less likely to be overweight or obese.