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ESL, ELL, or FLNE? How to Describe Students Whose First Language Isn’t English.

September 27, 2017

ESL. Non-native English speaker. Limited English proficient.   These may be some of the terms that come to mind when you’re trying to describe students whose first language isn’t English. But over time, as officials have recognized that some of these labels can perpetuate negative or inaccurate narratives, the terminology has changed and evolved.   Today, you might hear the U.S. Department of Education talk about English language learners (ELL) or just English learners (EL).
Youth Voice: We Must Never Give Up

July 11, 2017

Whether it’s learning English or challenging the negative stereotypes of being an immigrant, one young man demonstrates the importance of persistence, courage, and hope in hard times in this moving personal narrative.
The Limits that Language and Assumptions Place on Young People with Disabilities

July 11, 2017

When Tiffany Yu was only 9 years old, she was in a car accident that changed her life in two inalterable ways. First, Yu suffered severe nerve damage that limits the use of her right arm to this day, a condition called brachial plexus palsy.
Tailored Approaches to Help English Learners Graduate

June 28, 2017

In a Center for Promise study released this spring, an important finding emerged: Students whose first language is not English (FLNE) are not a homogenous group. But schools are often tasked with treating this dynamic group of students as if they are all the same.
Three Things that Can Make or Break FLNE Students’ Success

May 15, 2017

This story is part of the “90 for All” series, which examines the challenges facing traditionally underserved students, particularly low-income and homeless students, English language learners, students of color, and students with disabilities. One in five students in Massachusetts is classified as FLNE, a student whose First Language is not English. Even though Massachusetts has increased its high school graduation rate from just below 80 percent to 86 percent in recent years—one of the highest in the country—the rate for FLNE students is only 70 percent.
Mientras la nación enfrenta el problema de la disparidad en la graduación, un nuevo estudio de investigación sobre los estudiantes de Massachusetts cuya lengua materna no es el inglés sugiere una vía hacia el progreso orientada por los jóvenes para educad

May 11, 2017

BOSTON, 11 de mayo de 2017 /PRNewswire-HISPANIC PR WIRE/ -- Los jóvenes cuya lengua materna no es el Inglés (FLNE por sus siglas en inglés) representan el segmento de más rápido crecimiento de población dentro de las escuelas públicas de los Estados Unidos. A pesar de que se ha demostrado que los estudiantes FLNE tienen un alto nivel de optimismo y motivación en lo que se relaciona con el progreso académico, los estudiantes FLNE siguen graduándose en un menor porcentaje que el promedio nacional. Muchos estados están buscando nuevas formas de apoyar a esta población estudiantil.
As Country Grapples with Graduation Gaps, New Research on Mass. Students Whose First Language is Not English Suggests Youth-Led Path Forward for Educators, Policymakers

May 11, 2017

Youth whose First Language is Not English (FLNE) represent the fastest growing segment of the United States public school population. Despite evidence that FLNE students display high levels of optimism and motivation for academic advancement, they continue to graduate at lower rates than the national average.
What’s Working: Six Ways to 90

May 04, 2017

For the second year in a row, the United States remains off pace to reach a 90 percent on-time high school graduation rate by 2020, according to the 2017 Building a Grad Nation report.
OUR WORK: A Framework for Accelerating Progress for Children and Youth in America

April 17, 2017

How can we take what’s been learned and accelerate progress for young people in America, especially for those young people who are most vulnerable? How can we create the conditions for success for more young people, more quickly? To answer these questions, America’s Promise reviewed research about what’s changed in the past 20 years in young people’s lives and in our understanding of youth development. We surveyed our network, spoke with young people, and interviewed more than 200 people representing nonprofits, corporations, foundations, research and policy entities, educational institutions…
For this Community, Bilingualism is Not a Problem. It’s an Asset.

April 04, 2017

How can schools and communities create an inclusive environment for English-language learners? It starts by recognizing that bilingualism is an asset to be encouraged, not a problem to be solved.