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Leaders Tackle Challenges, Solutions in Latest Building a Grad Nation Report

June 14, 2018

In 2001, the national high school graduation rate stood at 71 percent. Today, no state in the nation has a high school graduation rate below that number. Furthermore, there are now 39 states above 80 percent.
Youth Warn Against More Law Enforcement in Schools at School Safety Listening Session

June 13, 2018

In the months following the shooting in Parkland, 23 state legislatures have moved to pass legislation to increase the number of law enforcement officers in schools. But at a recent listening session on school safety, young people explained why this is a bad idea.
2018 Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Raising High School Graduation Rates

June 05, 2018

Authored by Civic Enterprises and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University, and released annually in partnership with the Alliance for Excellent Education and America’s Promise Alliance, the Building a Grad Nation report examines both progress and challenges toward reaching the GradNation campaign goal of a national on-time graduation rate of 90 percent. AT&T, lead sponsor, has supported the report series since its inception through AT&T Aspire, the company’s $400 million commitment since 2008 to graduate more students from high school ready for college and career.…
For the First Time Ever, No State Is Reporting a Grad Rate Below 71 Percent, Says Grad Nation Report

June 05, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In 2001, the national high school graduation rate stood at 71 percent. Fifteen years later – and for the first time ever, no state in the nation has a high school graduation rate below 71 percent and there are now 39 states above 80 percent, a major milestone toward reaching the country’s goal of a 90 percent graduation rate, according to the latest Building a Grad Nation report.
Our National and Moral Responsibility to Young People

April 18, 2018

Adults often complain that kids today don't respect their elders. But what happens when it's the other way around? What if young people are the ones who are not getting the respect and dignity they need to be successful in school and life?
What’s Working: Closing the Hispanic/Latino Student Completion Gap in Higher Ed

January 25, 2018

As America’s Promise reported a few months ago, Hispanic/Latino students may be enrolling in college at higher rates, but they’re significantly less likely to finish their degrees than their peers. A recent study from The Education Trust shows that the right on-campus factors can turn the tide for these students, while examples from across the country and other studies offer various approaches for improving graduation rates. Here are a few recommendations for colleges to help their Hispanic/Latino populations succeed.
Hispanic/Latino Students Lead in High School, But Fall Behind in College. Why?

October 31, 2017

Two studies have been circulating the news lately that, at first glance, seem to directly contradict each other. One touts low high school dropout rates and higher college enrollment rates for Hispanic/Latino students, while another explores a more troubling fact: they may be enrolling in college, but they’re having a hard time finishing. Here’s why.
What’s Working: Could Better Data Improve Youth Employment?

October 18, 2017

If you had a million dollars, how would you use it to help young people find jobs? If you could change or create one policy to support youth employment, what would it be? Youth development experts tackled these questions at the 11th Annual JAG National Thought Leader Event on Oct. 11.
The Key to Success is Community Voice: Community Leader Spotlight with Hilda Ramirez, Latino Education Institute

April 21, 2017

Hilda Ramirez strongly believes that “the answers to the problems that communities face lies within the people who are affected by the challenges.” Ramirez is the assistant director of the Latino Education Institute of Worcester State University, a partnership of community leaders that provides outcome-based development programs in education, literacy, leadership, civic engagement, and health.
How One Young Person ‘Learned Not To Be Complacent With Injustice’

March 29, 2017

When Ornan Mendez’ parents lived in the Dominican Republic, they both had stable careers. His mother was a dentist and his father, an industrial engineer. When they moved to the United States to give their kids more opportunities, however, they had a hard time finding jobs.