The at-a-glance reference tables in this section illustrate the numbers of active duty, Reserve, and National Guard troops as well as their demographics, including gender, race, location and more. Demographic information is useful to anyone wishing to learn more about the military, or for anyone who needs quantitative data.

Terms

Active duty service members commit to the military full time often as a career. Reservists support active duty by being ready and “in reserve” in case active duty troops are stretched thin and more support is needed. Reservists are likely to have civilian jobs outside their Reserve commitments. National Guard members defend the homeland. National Guard units operate on a state level. These “citizen soldiers” are generally called to serve after Reservists have been activated.

Military Service Member Data

A total of 1.4 million active duty; this number is 30.8 percent smaller than it was in 1990, when there were 2.1 active duty members.

  • Army (561,979)
  • Air Force (329,640)
  • Navy (323,139)
  • Marine Corps (202,612)
  • Coast Guard (41,327)

What about women and minorities? 

  • Women now comprise 14.4 percent (about 200,000) of the active duty force
  • Minorities comprise 30 percent (about 425,100) of the active duty force
  • (These percentages are significantly lower than 2008 data.) 

What about their family status?

Active duty service members have more family members (1.9 million) than there are service members (1.4 million). Approximately 56 percent are married:

  • 70 percent of officers
  • 53 percent of enlisted personnel
  • 7 percent are in dual-military marriages
  • 39 percent of active duty members who are married have children
  • 5 percent are single parents
  • (The largest group of children is between birth and 5 years old, about 527,670.)

Where are they stationed?

The 10 states with the highest active duty military populations are:

  • California (159,380)
  • Virginia (127,981)
  • Texas (123,879)
  • North Carolina (116,114)
  • Georgia (74,235)
  • Washington (62,409)
  • Florida (57,558)
  • Hawaii (47,531)
  • Kentucky (45,568)
  • Colorado (36,998)

Reserve and National Guard Service Member Data

The Reserve and Guard Force consists of 857,261; the Reserve force is 29 percent smaller than it was in 1990, when there were almost 1.2 million reservists. 

What about women and minorities? 

  • Women comprise about 18 percent (153,071) the Reserve force.
  • Racial minorities comprise 24 percent (206,161) of the Reserve force.

What about their family status?
These service members have more family members (1.6 million) than there are service members (857,261). Just under half, or 48 percent, are married:

  • 71 percent of officers
  • 44 percent of enlisted personnel
  • 3 percent are in dual-military marriages
  • 34 percent of those who are married have children.
  • 9 percent are single parents.
  • The largest group of children is between the ages of 12 and 18 years (225,937) and the next largest group is between the ages of 6 and 11 years (224,085).

Where do they come from?

The 10 states with the highest numbers of Reserve and Guard troops are:

  • California (58,844)
  • Texas (55,971)
  • Florida (36,971)
  • Pennsylvania (32,494)
  • New York (30,353)
  • Georgia (29,964)
  • Ohio (28,455)
  • Virginia (25,841)
  • Illinois (25,417)
  • North Carolina (22,753)

Demographic Variable

Active Duty

Reserve and Guard                

MEMBERS
Total Number 1,417,370 857,261
Women 14.4%     17.9%
Minorities 30% 24.1%
Married 56.4% 48.2%
Dual-Military Marriages 6.7% 2.6%   

 
FAMILIES

Family Members 1,983,236    1,161,631
Spouses 725,877 413,295
Percent with Children 44.1% 43.2%
Children age 0-5 42.3% 27.9%
Percent Single Parents 5.4% 9.3%

 

2010 Department of Defense Military Demographics Table