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Articles covering topics relevant to America’s youth

What can states do to ensure that every student receives an effective education? What does a real commitment to equity look like? A panel of experts tackled these questions in their discussion of a new report, States Leading for Equity: Promising Practices Advancing the Equity Commitments. Here are the takeaways.
More than half of young people say they have experienced some form of sexual harassment in high school, yet schools often report zero instances of harassment—a figure experts say is “statistically impossible.” Why the disconnect between the data?
Within the national debate on how to increase college graduates, a key actor is missing—the families of those students being served. Usually, the families are perceived as ‘obstacles’ in helping first generation students access and complete a post-secondary education.
Young people across the country are improving media representation for people of color, promoting literacy education, speaking out against bullying, and much more. In honor of Black History Month, we compiled a list of seven African-American young leaders who are raising their voices, advocating for their causes, and fighting for a better future.
Here’s a troubling fact: students with disabilities are 50 percent more likely to be chronically absent—and research shows that chronic absenteeism is a better predictor of whether a student will drop out than test scores. A recent webinar offered tips for how educators can help students with disabilities overcome these odds and succeed in the classroom.
So far, this year’s State of the State addresses reveals that, when it comes to education, leaders across the country will continue to prioritize workforce development. Here’s a look at five governors who specifically mentioned high school graduation rates in their speeches and how they plan to improve education for young people in their states.
If you work in any field even remotely related to education, odds are you’ve come across a headline about D.C.’s Ballou High School at some point in the past few months. Here’s a quick rundown and reminder of everything we know so far.
As America’s Promise reported a few months ago, Hispanic/Latino students may be enrolling in college at higher rates, but they’re significantly less likely to finish their degrees than their peers. A recent study from The Education Trust shows that the right on-campus factors can turn the tide for these students, while examples from across the country and other studies offer various approaches for improving graduation rates. Here are a few recommendations for colleges to help their Hispanic/Latino populations succeed.
“If the success of our efforts is tracked by numbers, we have lost the point completely and our children feel it. Before data, graphs, and systems there were relationships and community.” Alexis Goffe, GradMinnesota Director for Minnesota Alliance with Youth, learned this lesson when a student confided that some teachers seemed to care more about tracking attendance than the actual student. America’s Promise asked Goffe about his state’s effort to create a GradNation for all young people and the important role of caring adult relationships in this work. Here are his answers.
When you consider all the societal and individual benefits of service, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous quote on service takes on new meaning. “Life’s most persistent and urgent question,” he said, is this: “What are you doing for others?” Ironically, it is in asking this question that we indirectly consider what it is we are doing for ourselves.
This January, as MENTOR spotlights what it means to be a mentor In Real Life for the third year in a row, we wanted to bring you stories that challenge some of the myths of mentoring (that you have to bear the official title of “mentor” to make a difference), demonstrate the impact of being a caring adult, and help dispel some of your confusions or concerns.
Mindy Sturm serves as the director of the Mayor’s Office for Children, Youth, and Families (MOCYF) in Charleston, South Carolina. MOCYF focuses on improving the conditions for children, mobilizing resources in the community to work on their behalf, and developing strategies to support children, youth and families.
From an online community dedicated to supporting foster youth to an organization focused on ending bullying, five new organizations have joined America’s Promise Alliance as partners this month. Find more information on their goals, missions, and efforts below.
“It might be no surprise that students experiencing homelessness are more at risk of dropping out than others—as this young person illustrates—but new research shows that the inverse is also true: When it comes to youth homelessness, not having a high school diploma is the biggest risk factor of all.”
By now, you’ve probably heard that the Department of Education published the latest numbers on grad rates earlier this week, revealing that the on-time high school graduation rate has risen to a high of 84.1 percent. Leaders of the GradNation campaign quickly published a statement both celebrating the progress and urging the education community to double-down on accountability.
When it comes to graduation rates, Indiana has some serious bragging rights. Not only did it have one of the highest high school graduation rates of any state in the country in 2015, it also reported the smallest graduation gap between low-income and non-low-income students—no easy feat, considering more than one-third of Indiana students come from low-income families. So how did they do it?