Press Release

America’s Promise Alliance Receives Grant from W.K. Kellogg Foundation to Support Campaign to Improve the Lives of 15 Million American Youth

(ALEXANDRIA, VA) –The America’s Promise Alliance (the Alliance), today announced they have received a $400,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to help support its new 15 in 5 Campaign, which aims to improve the lives of 15 million disadvantaged young people over the next five years. 

The grant will be used to help fund the planning and execution of the 15 in 5 Campaign’s three new National Action Strategies which will see that the nation’s most vulnerable young people experience the key developmental supports—the Five Promises—caring adults; safe places; healthy start; effective education; opportunity to help others—that research has shown they need to succeed.

“Ambitious goals like those of the 15 in 5 campaign become a reality because of the support of great foundations like W.K. Kellogg,” said Marguerite W. Kondracke, president and CEO, America’s Promise Alliance. “The W.K. Kellogg Foundation has helped generations of people across the globe achieve their potential and we are now better positioned to ensure America’s young people complete high school and are prepared for adulthood.” 

The three National Action Strategies include:

All Kids Covered: Enroll all eligible children in health insurance. There are 6.5 million children who are eligible for the State Children’s Health Insurance Program or Medicaid, but currently not enrolled.

Ready for The Real World: Engage middle-schoolers in service learning and career exploration to deepen their motivation for achievement in their world – including school, community and the workplace.

Where the Kids Are: Beginning with schools as hubs, deliver more of the Five Promises where kids already congregate. There are more than 11 million students enrolled in Title One schools, which represent 95 percent of the nation’s highest poverty schools

The Alliance’s landmark research study, Every Child, Every Promise (ECEP), which was released in 2006, showed that the chances of children succeeding in life are greatly increased when they experience the Five Promises at home, in school and in their communities. Specifically, ECEP found that children receiving four of the Five Promises, as compared to youth receiving zero to one Promise, are far more likely to be successful, including twice as likely to get A’s, twice as likely to avoid violence and 40 percent more likely to volunteer. Moreover, the research shows that receiving four out of five of these basic wrap-around supports has the potential to level the playing field for youth across racial and economic lines.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation was established in 1930 by breakfast cereal pioneer W.K. Kellogg and is one of the world’s largest private foundations. The Foundation’s work on behalf of and in support of programs spans the globe and is rooted in its mission to help people help themselves through the practical application of knowledge and resources to improve their quality of life and that of future generations. In 2006, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation distributed $329 million in grant and program funding support with $39 million of that going to work in the Gulf Coast region in the United States to support rebuilding efforts following Hurricane Katrina.


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About the America’s Promise Alliance- www.americaspromise.org
America’s Promise Alliance is the nation’s leader in forging a strong and effective partnership alliance comprised of corporations, nonprofit organizations, foundations, policymakers, advocacy and faith groups committed to ensuring that children receive the fundamental resources - the Five Promises – they need to lead successful, healthy and productive lives and build a stronger society. Building on the legacy of our founder General Colin Powell, the Alliance believes the success of our children is grounded in experiencing the Five Promises - caring adults; safe place; a healthy start; an effective education; and opportunities to help others - at home, in school and in the community.