News

Articles covering topics relevant to America’s youth

When 19-year-old Henry Seaton was in high school, he wasn’t allowed to use either the women's restroom or the men's restroom. He had to use the nurse’s restroom instead, which the school thought was the best way to keep him from being bullied. At first, Seaton agreed with the administration. But he now has a different perspective.
“Students who miss just two or three days of school a month—defined as chronic absenteeism—are significantly more likely to drop out of school altogether. This Attendance Awareness Month, here’s what America’s Promise national partner Attendance Works wants you to know about chronic absenteeism and how to fight it.”
The following grants and funding opportunities are currently accepting applicants. These grants are not offered through America's Promise Alliance, but they each relate to our Five Promises.
In the last 20 years, infant mortality, teen pregnancy, and youth incarceration rates have gone down, while high school graduation rates are up. More young people are pursuing postsecondary education, and teens are also smoking and drinking less.
When it comes to preparing high school graduates for college, a new report from the Alliance for Excellent Education says that not all diplomas are created equal—and that one type of diploma in particular stands out above the rest: a college and career ready diploma.
Join America’s Promise Alliance, Attendance Works and Everyone Graduates Center for an interactive Twitter chat on August 17th on what schools and communities can do to reduce chronic absence this school year.
The United Way of Metropolitan Dallas looks at problems in the same way it approaches solving them: Everything is connected. The organization’s mission is to tackle issues of education, health, and income in the Dallas area, and it works with businesses, governments, nonprofits, schools, families, and individuals to do it.
Imagine you’re a mentor for a student who needs immediate help. What’s the best way to respond? Would you first meet the mentee’s immediate emotional needs, ensure their physical and psychological safety, or focus on problem-solving and resources?
The following grants and funding opportunities are currently accepting applicants. These grants are not offered through America's Promise Alliance, but they each relate to our Five Promises.
How does the trauma we experience as children impact our lives as adults, and most importantly, what can buffer the impacts of adversity in the lives of children?
Along with spotlighting states that can serve as examples to the rest of the country, Time to Act 2017: Put Data in the Hands of the People challenges leaders in education agencies, state boards, legislatures, and governors to prioritize the effective use of data in the following four ways.
How does Isela Melendez-Carpio know she’s been successful? When a student believes they are fully capable of achieving their dreams. This isn’t always easy. Many of the students Melendez-Carpio works with as a career program manager for Posse DC suffer from “imposter syndrome;” their socio-economic background can make them feel like they don’t deserve the prestigious internships, fellowships, jobs, or graduate schools that she connects them with.
When Tiffany Yu was only 9 years old, she was in a car accident that changed her life in two inalterable ways. First, Yu suffered severe nerve damage that limits the use of her right arm to this day, a condition called brachial plexus palsy.
Esperanzita Castillo, 20, dropped out of school when she was in the sixth grade. By September of 2015, she was out of school, out of work, and seemingly out of options. And then, a security guard at a local career service center handed her a flyer for a program that would change her life.
America’s Promise Alliance hosted the Twitter chat, an ongoing series focused on the Five Promises, the fundamental resources all children need to succeed—caring adults, safe places, a healthy start, effective education, and opportunities to serve. 
In a Center for Promise study released this spring, an important finding emerged: Students whose first language is not English (FLNE) are not a homogenous group. But schools are often tasked with treating this dynamic group of students as if they are all the same.